Spike is a high energy, young Yellow Labrador Retriever whose sole focus will be you if you are anywhere in his vicinity. He's not that interested in food or toys. Mostly, it's just his person he cares about. His attention is a little over the top right now but he's a young lad and with plenty of exercise and some maturity, he should settle into that ideal dog.




The best way to check on the adoption status of this dog (and other dogs and cats and other small domestic animals) is to visit Toronto Animal Services adoption website or call 416 338 6668 for the Toronto Animal Services South shelter. If the dog is no longer on the TAS adoption website, it's probably because it's been adopted already.



Due to a combination of bad weather and being out of town, I haven't been able to take photos of the dogs at TAS-S for a couple of weeks now and I've got no photos of up and coming into adoption dogs to show you.

So, instead, for the next few posts, I thought I'd play catch up again and put up some photos of dogs who were adopted out recently but whose photos I didn't get a chance to post yet.

This one here is Dizzy, a young Golden Retriever. Goldens have always been popular dogs and younger Goldens especially so and Dizzy, who was really only 50% dizzy, was no exception. In and out of adoption in no time.





Pacey is like a miniature Australian Cattle Dog. He's kinda small for that line of work, though, but maybe he can herd miniature cattle.

Having probably been brought up in the city, I suspect the only thing Pacey is going to herd is your feet to your fridge where you can fetch him whatever is inside, thank you very much.





The best way to check on the adoption status of this dog (and other dogs and cats and other small domestic animals) is to visit Toronto Animal Services adoption website or call 416 338 6668 for the Toronto Animal Services South shelter. If the dog is no longer on the TAS adoption website, it's probably because it's been adopted already.



Ok, a whole lot of dogs have been passing through Toronto Animal Services South the last couple of weeks and they've been getting snapped up before I had time to post them so I'm playing catch up again.

Here's Angel, a lovely Beagle mix who was in adoption for maybe a day before someone took her home.





A couple of months ago, the owner of Kennel Cafe here in my neighbourhood went down to Mexico for a visit and came back with some additional carry-on in the form of a small bundle of fur to be adopted out in Toronto. Her name is Lily and best guess is that she's a Schnauzer Dachshund cross.

Lily's been spayed and health checked and groomed. She's housebroken and knows what it means to have a roof over her head. She's quiet and loves people and dogs. And her personality is as cute as she looks.





For some exciting footage of Lily assaulting a dog four times her size and also for adoption inquiries, check out the following video and Facebook page: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v=10151288693676393



Laid back with a solid, dependable personality. Winter's coming. Time to get your couch warmer.





The best way to check on the adoption status of this dog (and other dogs and cats and other small domestic animals) is to visit Toronto Animal Services adoption website or call 416 338 6668 for the Toronto Animal Services South shelter. If the dog is no longer on the TAS adoption website, it's probably because it's been adopted already.



Sadie is very gentle, very calm Lab mix. She takes the small cookie out of my hand like a florist handling a delicate flower.

She's overweight, though - overweight enough you could use her back as a table because it's so wide. Ok, that's mean. No one should use her as a table. Perhaps an ottoman, though. Ok, that's mean, too.

How about who ever adopts her put her on a diet so that one day soon she'll be able to touch her back toes again and climb the stairs without huffing.





The best way to check on the adoption status of this dog (and other dogs and cats and other small domestic animals) is to visit Toronto Animal Services adoption website or call 416 338 6668 for the Toronto Animal Services South shelter. If the dog is no longer on the TAS adoption website, it's probably because it's been adopted already.



Doby's debut was a bit delayed due to an infection he got from his neuter. He's all fine now and is staying on with his foster parents until he gets adopted.

Here's his profile from his foster:

Please meet Doby! He has come along way in the past two months. Doby was brought into TAS as a stray. He went through the regular TAS vetting where he was sent to the vet to be neutered. Doby developed a horrible infection from the surgery and was in sooo much pain he could hardly sit. He had to wear a cone and was very uncomfortable in his cage. He had trouble eating with his cone on so he ended up losing a lot of weight. He was so sad in the shelter.

TAS felt he would do much better in a foster home where he could be monitored throughout his healing process and get that loving tender care. Within a month - Doby was a completely different dog. His foster mom has fallen in love with him. He is finally coneless and his infection is completely gone. He has the sparkle back in his eye and most importantly has gained all the weight he had lost back! He is an extremely happy, sweet dog with a gentle disposition that loves the company of people (owners and guests alike). He loves to play and gets along with dogs, cats and children alike.

Doby is a doberman breed mix, therefore he is smaller than a regular doberman. He has one small white patch on his chest. Doby is between one and a half and two years old and still has a lot of his puppy energy. He loves walks and off leash dog parks. He would be ideally suited to an individual or a family that has the time daily to give him the exercise he needs, a large outdoor property or the resources to invest in a dog walker in the city.

In the home, Doby is well behaved. He is not territorial, no chewing on furniture or barking at noises. He knows all basic commands, listens well and is extremely trainable for an individual that can be consistent with him.

Doby’s name was given to him in his foster home, after the loyal yet clumsy Harry Potter character.

Doby will make a great loyal and loving companion. Please consider giving Doby his forever home. He will remain with his foster mommy until being adopted. If you are interested in viewing Doby please contact TAS volunteer Ashley Hyslop at: ashley_hyslop at hotmail dot com, or 647 458 0220. All screening will be done by a TAS employee. He is currently being fostered in a downtown Toronto neighbourhood.







Doby is being fostered offsite from Toronto Animal Services South but will be available for meet and greets at the shelter if you request to see him.



Vincent is a multicoloured Sharpei pup unlike any I've seen before and he's also a very friendly fellow but unfortunately he's got a condition called cherry eye which you can see in the photographs.

Toronto Animal Services South tried doing corrective surgery on him to repair the cherry eye and it seemed to hold for a few days but then the red bump popped out again.

Cherry eye isn't a debilitating condition if routine maintenance is done, meaning Vincent will likely need eye drops to keep his eye moist and healthy. His new owner can further consult an ophthalmologist to see if any further operations can be done to permanently alleviate the condition.



The best way to check on the adoption status of this dog (and other dogs and cats and other small domestic animals) is to visit Toronto Animal Services adoption website or call 416 338 6668 for the Toronto Animal Services South shelter. If the dog is no longer on the TAS adoption website, it's probably because it's been adopted already.



Chico lost his eye due to complications stemming from an earlier cherry eye surgery. I feel for the poor li'l bugger but he himself isn't missing a beat. Still chipper, still happy to be hanging around his human and doggie pals.

Hopefully he'll get out of TAS-S before Halloween so someone can dress him up like a one-eyed pirate.





The best way to check on the adoption status of this dog (and other dogs and cats and other small domestic animals) is to visit Toronto Animal Services adoption website or call 416 338 6668 for the Toronto Animal Services South shelter. If the dog is no longer on the TAS adoption website, it's probably because it's been adopted already.



Jenny is a Pomeranian who was originally sold by the international puppy traffickers known as the Hunte corporation.

If you go to their website, which I'm not going to link to for fear of catching malignant douchebag scabies, they claim that:

At Hunte, our mission remains to ensure that every precious puppy is safely transitioned into a warm, loving home.

So how is it then that Jenny was sold to a puppy miller who then decided to get rid of her once she got too old to be of any further use?

I guess some people have a different definition of "warm, loving home" than others.

Toronto Animal Services had to have a vet remove ten of Jenny's teeth because they were so rotten from all the care she received in her "warm, loving home".

Jenny will be going up for adoption soon and then there is a real chance she'll end up in a truly warm and loving home.




The best way to check on the adoption status of this dog (and other dogs and cats and other small domestic animals) is to visit Toronto Animal Services adoption website or call 416 338 6668 for the Toronto Animal Services South shelter. If the dog is no longer on the TAS adoption website, it's probably because it's been adopted already.



Snooker, a Beagle mix, came in with two other Beagle mixes about a week ago. Snooker was adopted out very quickly and no wonder: a touch shy, but then friendly and playful.




Snooker has been adopted but her Beagle pals Angel and Layla are still available.



Is Candy ever a cutie. I really like her somewhat scraggly coat as opposed to the blow dried look of most Pomeranians. Not that there's anything wrong with looking like a puffball about to be blown away by the first gust of wind but Candy's got a more down-to-earth manner about her. She's more the pom next door and not so much the red carpet pom. Very sweet girl.




The best way to check on the adoption status of this dog (and other dogs and cats and other small domestic animals) is to visit Toronto Animal Services adoption website or call 416 338 6668 for the Toronto Animal Services South shelter. If the dog is no longer on the TAS adoption website, it's probably because it's been adopted already.



Just the name Honey Boo Boo conjures up shudders in most people at least when applied to some weirdly popular, attention-seeking missile of a child on American reality TV. When applied to this pup, however, well, I'd much rather watch this girl on TV than the other one.





Honey Boo Boo came in along Magoo and Penny from a puppy mill via Kismutt Rescue and she was adopted out almost immediately.

These three, though, may be some of the last puppy mill rescues Toronto Animal Services South will get from Kismutt. That's because just over a month ago, one of the papers local to the area published an article which seemed to imply there was no puppy mill problem in the area and that basically Kimberly Thomas, owner of the rescue, was making it all up in her head.

“I’ve been in the kennels three or four times [this year] and they are fantastic,” says local animal control officer Evelyn Hahn.

Is this what Hahn considers "fantastic"?







All of the above photos were taken by Thomas of dogs from puppy mills in her area.

The article is so obviously biased against Thomas that the reporter didn't even try to keep up appearances of objectivity by at least interviewing her for her side of the story.

If memory serves me correctly, immediately after the on-line article came out, dozens of comments protesting the biases in the reporting were submitted and now, even those have been deleted.

So, now the word is out in the puppy mill community that Thomas is trying to expose their deeds and the millers no longer call her up to buy their used dogs.

One can only assume the worst with regards to what the millers are doing with their unwanted livestock now.

Magoo, Penny and Honey Boo Boo were rescued just in time. A week later and they'd be ... well, you figure it out.



There's a chance Thomas may still have access to mill dogs from farms further afield who didn't receive the particular newspaper in question but otherwise there's no silver lining to this story. Even more dogs and pups now will live their whole lives under brutal puppy mill conditions and then they will be unceremoniously killed.



Another Georgia dog care of Ashley Hyslop. Photos are by Bridget McDermid.


Please meet Bat! There is something very special about her! Bat came from a kill shelter in Georgia. She had three strikes against her in Georgia – she was black (black dogs do not get adopted in the Southern States); she was Heartworm positive (but has since been treated successfully); and worst of all she was brought into a shelter that had no adoption program

Bat had a guardian angel looking out for her – she was fully treated for Heartworm and brought up to Toronto where she had a much better chance of finding her forever home.

Bat is an amazing dog! She is such a sweetheart. It takes her a few moments to warm up to people and she plays the shy girl act – however once she’s comfortable she becomes your shadow and tries to be a lap dog. Bat will fight for all your attention – so working on boundaries with her is a must. She is great at kissing and giving lots of cuddles. Bat is approx 1.5 years of age and was brought in as a stray! She is calm and friendly however training would be great as Bat is very smart and still quite young.

She loves other dogs and people. Bat is great in a crate and is a quiet dog! She loves the dog park – once she gets warmed up she loves running laps around the park! Bat is asking that you give her a chance because she will totally melt your heart!

The best way to check on the adoption status of this dog (and other dogs and cats and other small domestic animals) is to visit Toronto Animal Services adoption website or call 416 338 6668 for the Toronto Animal Services South shelter. If the dog is no longer on the TAS adoption website, it's probably because it's been adopted already.





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A request

The reason for this blog is to help get specific dogs adopted from TAS but equally important is to try to normalize the idea of shelter dogs being just as good and just as desirable as any other dogs including those which are regularly merchandised by backyard breeders, puppy millers and those few remaining pet store owners who still feel a need to sell live animals. The single greatest stigma shelter animals still face is the belief that shelter animals are substandard animals. Anyone who has had enough experience with shelter animals knows this is untrue but the general public hasn't had the same experiences you've had. They see a nice dog photo in a glossy magazine and too many of them would never think of associating that dog with a dog from a shelter. After all, no one abandons perfectly good dogs, right? Unfortunately, as we all know, perfectly good dogs are abandoned all the time.

The public still too often associates shelter dogs with images of beat up, sick, dirty, severely traumatized animals and while we definitely sometimes see victims such as these, they are certainly not the majority and, regardless, even the most abused animals can very often be saved and made whole again.

Pound Dogs sometimes discusses the sad histories some of the dogs have suffered. For the most part, though, it tries to present the dogs not as victims but as great potential family members. The goal is to raise the profiles of animals in adoption centers so that a potential pet owner sees them as the best choice, not just as the charity choice.

So, here's the favour I'm asking. Whenever you see a dog picture on these pages you think is decent enough, I'd like you to consider sharing it on Facebook or any other social media sites you're using (I know many of you do this already and thank you for that). And when you share it, please mention that the dog in the photo is a shelter dog like so many other shelter dogs waiting for a home. If we can get even five percent of the pet buying public to see shelter dogs differently, to see how beautiful they are and how wonderful they are, and to consider shelter dogs as their first choice for a new family member, we can end the suffering of homeless pets in this country.
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